(Image courtesy of Studio Incendo)

Image courtesy of Studio Incendo

Hong Kong: A Timeline

POSTED October 14, 2020

 

With all of the constant news stories currently flooding the media, it is easy for some very important stories to become “invisible”.  One such story is that of the Hong Kong Protests for human and political rights.

 

Hong Kong faces protests dating all the way back to 1987. On July 1st, 1997, Hong Kong was transferred from Britain’s ownership to China’s ownership. However, the city is governed by its own people, named the People’s Republic of China. In February 2019, a bill was proposed to Hong Kong to establish mechanisms for transfers of fugitives, called that Extradition Bill. And with that bill, came backlash. 

 

This bill limits rights from Hong Kong citizens, and they are not too pleased about it. Some rights the bill threatens are: Freedom of speech, the right to vote, freedom of demonstration, assembly, and association are a few rights taken away.

 

1987

More than 1 Million people take to the streets to protest the massacre of pro-democracy.

 

1992

Hong Kong announces democratic reforms.

 

1997 – July 1st

Hong Kong was transferred from Britain’s ownership to China’s ownership.

 

2003 – July

Half a million people protest and introduce Article 23, which is an anti-subversion 

law that could limit freedom of speech.

 

2014 – August

Chinese legislation rules out open elections, only allowing candidates approved 

by Beijing to run for its most top political position.

 

2019 – February – March

Hong Kong announces a new bill that will allow extradition to Mainland China. 

Millions gather in the streets for a peaceful protest.

 

2019 – June 12

Violent protests are becoming more common. The second reading of the 

extradition bill was postponed due to the riots.

 

2020

Violent protests continue. As the Black Lives Matter movement grows in support, 

protests in Hong Kong are breaking out even more.

 

The Extradition Bill fears a lot of Hong Kongers. If you commit a crime, or you are wanted, you would be transferred to Mainland China while on trial. The judges follow the Chinese Communists policies. This new policy could almost pick up anyone, then transfer them to Mainland China. That’s why almost all of Hong Kong is protesting to this very day.

 

Resources:

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/culture/topics/reference/hong-kong-history-visualized/

 

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